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Illinois Prescription Monitoring Program Enrollment Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

What is the Prescription Monitoring Program (PMP)?
How does Public Act 100-0564 affect me – a doctor?
What does the legislation actually say?
What if I don’t prescribe opioids? Do I still need to register with the PMP?
What about Schedule II drugs like Ritalin and Adderall?
Exactly what does "document an attempt" mean?
One of the exceptions in the legislation is for a seven-day or less supply of a Schedule II narcotic provided by a hospital emergency department when treating an acute, traumatic medical condition. What is the accepted definition of an "acute, traumatic medical condition?"
What if I’m retired? Do I still need to register with the PMP?
How do I register with the PMP?  What information is required from me?
I registered with the PMP, but have not received confirmation of my registration yet. How do I know whether my registration worked?
When I visited the PMP’s website, I was prompted for a password. I don’t have one so how do I obtain a password?
I access and use the PMP through my hospital’s electronic medical record (EMR) system. Am I considered to be already enrolled in the PMP?
Can prescribers designate others to access the PMP?
I treat patients with opioid medications in both inpatient settings and operating rooms. Do I need to check the PMP?
What qualifies as an "initial prescription" under the law?
What if I fail to register with the PMP or check it as described in the legislation?
Why do I see patients or prescriptions attributed to me who did not see or write, and what can I do about it?
How do I contact the PMP?

Q  What is the Prescription Monitoring Program (PMP)?

A  The PMP is an electronic tool that collects information on controlled substance prescriptions, Schedules II, III, IV and V. This prescription data is reported to the PMP database on a daily basis by retail pharmacies dispensing in Illinois. The PMP enhances prescribers’ and dispensers’ capacity to review a patient’s prescription history for therapeutic and clinical reasons and to assist in the effective treatment of patients seeking medical care. The PMP was authorized by the Illinois Controlled Substances Act and strictly adheres to HIPAA, and access, disclosure and confidentiality provisions of Illinois Law.

Q  How does Public Act 100-0564 affect me – a doctor?

A The new law, Public Act 100-0564, requires that all prescribers with a valid Illinois controlled substances license must be registered with Illinois’ PMP by Jan. 1, 2018. Prescribers must also document an attempt to check the PMP for all initial prescriptions of Schedule II opioids. 

Q  What does the legislation actually say?

A  There are three integral changes to current law that impact physicians:

  1. Effective January 1, 2018, each prescriber possessing a valid Illinois controlled substances license must register with the PMP.
  2. When providing an initial prescription for Schedule II narcotics, such as opioids, each prescriber, or his or her designee, must also document an attempt to access patient information in the PMP to gage patient access to controlled substances. Exceptions to this requirement include prescriptions for oncology treatment or palliative care, or a seven-day or less supply provided by a hospital emergency department when treating an acute, traumatic medical condition. The attempt to access should be documented in the patient's medical record.
  3. A hospital must facilitate the designation of a prescriber's designee for the purpose of accessing the PMP for services provided at the hospital.

Q  What if I don’t prescribe opioids? Do I still need to register with the PMP?

A  Even if you don’t currently prescribe opioids and don’t intend to prescribe them in the future, if you have a valid Illinois controlled substance license, you must still register with the PMP.

Q  What about Schedule II drugs like Ritalin and Adderall?

A The legislation applies to Schedule II narcotics, such as opioids. We do not believe the new law applies to non-opioid stimulants, such as Ritalin and Adderall.

Q  Exactly what does "document an attempt" mean?

A The PMP can be cumbersome and because problems within the system that prescribers are not always successful in obtaining the information they seek. ISMS, therefore, advocated for amending the legislation to require only that a prescriber makes a good faith effort to check the PMP. If a prescriber cannot get on to the PMP when attempting to comply with the law, he or she is required to document, in the patient’s medical record, that an attempt was made to check the PMP.

Q  One of the exceptions in the legislation is for a seven-day or less supply of a Schedule II narcotic provided by a hospital emergency department when treating an acute, traumatic medical condition. What is the accepted definition of an "acute, traumatic medical condition?"

A An acute, traumatic medical condition is not defined in the legislation and, therefore, ISMS is unable to provide guidance. This language may be defined by rule at a later date.

Q  What if I’m retired? Do I still need to register with the PMP?

A  Even if you don’t currently prescribe opioids and don’t intend to prescribe them in the future, if you have a valid Illinois controlled substance license you must still register with the PMP.

Q  How do I register with the PMP?  What information is required from me?

A  Here’s how to register with the PMP:

First, visit the PMP's registration web page

  • You will be prompted to provide standard information, such as your Illinois medical license, mailing address, phone number, email address, etc.  
  • Next, create a password. 
  • You will also be asked to provide your federal DEA license number and your NPI number (the NPI number is optional). 
  • Some of your information may be pre-populated after entering your medical license number.
  • Confirmation will be confirmed via email within 2 to 3 days of submitting your registration. However, due to the surge in enrollment the department is experiencing intermittent backlogs, which may delay your confirmation.

Q  I registered with the PMP, but have not received confirmation of my registration yet. How do I know whether my registration worked?

A  For most registrants, confirmation will come via email within 2 to 3 days of submitting your registration. Please note: The PMP is experiencing a very high volume of those seeking to register, and currently has a large backlog of registrants waiting to be verified. If you used a personal email address to verify your registration, PMP staff will be calling you to verify your registration. However, you may experience a longer delay in receiving your verification.

Q  When I visited the PMP’s website, I was prompted for a password. I don’t have one so how do I obtain a password?

A  As a new user, you will need to create a password by clicking on the link below the login area on the PMP’s website. Or you can access the prescriber registration page here.

Q  I access and use the PMP through my hospital’s electronic medical record (EMR) system. Am I considered to be already enrolled in the PMP?

A  PMP staff have indicated that they are working with institutions and EMR vendors on incorporating an "identifier" into EMRs that are integrated with the PMP. However, at this time, those who only access the PMP through their institutions' EMR system currently are NOT considered to be registered with the PMP. Register in the PMP here.

Q  Can prescribers designate others to access the PMP?

A  Prescribers may delegate authority to persons of their choice to access the PMP if these conditions are met:

  • The designee must be employed by the same hospital or health care system, or employed by the same practice as the prescriber.
  • The prescriber must ensure that his or her designee is sufficiently competent in using the PMP, and that access is limited to authorized purposes and the data is kept confidential.
  • The prescriber is responsible for any breach of confidentiality.
  • To delegate authority,  sign into the PMP and choose "PMP Collaborative Practice Agreement Registration."

Please note: PMP staff have indicated that registered prescribers may have some difficulty delegating authority to others to check the PMP. This functionality is expected to be fully operational sometime in early 2018.

Q  I treat patients with opioid medications in both inpatient settings and operating rooms. Do I need to check the PMP?

A  Opioids used in inpatient or operating room settings are not generally considered as reportable to the PMP.

Q  What qualifies as an "initial prescription" under the law?

A  PMP staff are currently seeking guidance on what specifically will be considered an "initial prescription" under the law, and has currently formed a work group to explore the subject. ISMS will be an active member of the work group, and our Opioids Task Force will continue to study the issue. To clarify the term initial prescription, further rules may be made, a clarification bill may be passed, or administrative guidance may be distributed to prescribers.

Q  What if I fail to register with the PMP or check it as described in the legislation?

A  The legislation does not articulate any specific penalties. However, the Illinois Department of Financial and Professional Regulation (IDFPR) has indicated that prescribers not in compliance may be subject to disciplinary action by IDFPR.

Q  Why do I see patients or prescriptions attributed to me who did not see or write, and what can I do about it?

A The information contained in the PMP comes from pharmacies, and is subject to erroneous entry of your name/DEA number by the pharmacy. However, it is also possible that unauthorized prescriptions are being deliberately written in your name/DEA number. The PMP recommends that you contact them with details of the discrepancies you find.

ISMS also recommends that you notify the Illinois Department of Financial and Professional Regulation (IDFPR) and the DEA of the discrepancies you find. If you believe unauthorized prescriptions are being written using your name/DEA number, you should file a police report or obtain the report filed by the pharmacy.

Q  How do I contact the PMP?

A  You may contact the PMP by calling 217-524-1311, or sending an email.



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